Category: Events

Happy news

I already posted this on this blog’s Facebook page, but I thought I’d write about it here in greater detail.  I’ve been biking a fair amount lately, now that my work schedule has returned to something resembling normalcy.  The weather has been great recently, a few days of rain notwithstanding, and I thoroughly love the autumn temperatures, whether I’m on my bike or not.  Anyway, today I biked from home to campus in the morning and back again in the afternoon with no incidents.  Traffic was light, and the weather was perfect.

This evening I had a meeting to attend at Grace St. Luke’s Church, so I left home around 5:40 PM and began my bike ride.  As I was biking west on Young Avenue, I was approaching a parked car in the far right lane, where I was biking.  At the same time, a car was approaching from the rear on my left hand side.  As I neared the parked car and the passing car approached me, I wondered if I would have time to pass the parked car before I myself was passed.  I probably wouldn’t have had time to do so, but it didn’t matter, because the passing car slowed just as I was approaching the parked car, allowing me to safely pass it and return to the far right lane.  I was pleasantly surprised and waved my thanks.

And then, it happened again, on Belvedere, as I was heading north to GSL.  I was approaching a parked car when a car, soon to pass me, slowed and allowed me to safely pass the parked car.  I know we’ve all had close calls in traffic, whether it be while passing a car or being passed, and we’ve all had a driver or two extend the hand of courtesy.  But twice in one day?  This is unprecedented, my people, and quite welcome.  Are Memphis drivers becoming used to cyclists and learning to share the road?  Let’s all hope so.

Speaking of good news, hopefully you’ve heard about the Hampline.  It’s a two mile, on-road, multi-use trail that will connect the Shelby Farms Greenline to Overton Park.  Making this connection safe and protected for cyclists and other travelers will do a lot to strengthen the routes between east Memphis and the ‘burbs to Midtown, Downtown, and other points west.  The Hampline is partially crowd-funded, so you have an opportunity to support this unique project with your resources.  The goal is to raise $75,000, of which around $12,500 has been raised so far.  I will definitely kick in some cheddar to support this crucial and innovative improvement in our cycling infrastructure, and I hope you will too.  Special thanks to the Hightailers for matching contributions earlier in the campaign.

Also, the good people at the Peddler Bike Shop are sponsoring a Traffic Skills 101 class on Saturday, November 2.  It’s geared (pun intended) for new or potential cyclists.  The class costs $50 and is limited to 10 people, so register now!

Lastly, this has very little to do with cycling per se, but it sounds really cool, so I thought I’d share.  It’s called the “I Wish You Well” Wall, and it’s happening tomorrow at Overton Square.  The idea is that people will write a message of encouragement or something like that and leave it on the wall next to Bar Louie.  (See the event page for more information.)  I’m not usually one for public displays of positivity – perhaps it’s because I’m an economist, or because of my Scottish heritage – but this event sounds like something Memphis could use.  I’m going to visit and contribute my note, biking-related no doubt.

OK, that’s all for now.  Thanks for reading and as always, I’ll see you out there, biking in Memphis

End of the week links

Hi everyone.  I wanted to share a few links and news items on this lovely Sunday afternoon.

First, you will never catch me sporting one of these (although my 11-year-old self has already asked for one for Christmas).  It reminds me of the whistle tip phenomenon of ten years ago.

Second, grab your spare parts and unneeded gear.  Memphis is having another bike swap meet.  This one is scheduled for Saturday, March 16 at Minglewood Hall on Madison, from 2:00 PM to 7:00 PM.  Admission is $5, and there will be beer.  Those of you with long memories of Memphis cycling remember the swap meets of a few years ago.  I went to the last one.  It was great.  That’s where I bought these beauties.

Swag

So much swag.

The University of Memphis Tiger Bikes bike share program is almost ready to launch.  I think I’ve posted about this before; can’t remember though.  Anyway, my friend and colleague Amelia Mayahi and I have been working on this project for around two years.  The bikes, 55 of them, are all assembled and waiting to be ridden.  We’re still waiting on a few last details to be taken care of before students can begin using the bikes.  I’m really excited for this program to take off and to see more students biking around campus.  Special thanks to the good people at the Peddler Bike Shop for supplying the bikes and invaluable assistance.

More good biking news for Memphis: we’re hosting the Tennessee Bike Summit!  It’s going down May 22 – May 24 at Rhodes College.  This will be a great opportunity to highlight all the positive changes that have been happening in local cycling, and in other cities across the state.  Registration opens March 1.

Also, if you’re a fixie fan, check out this page.

Speaking of fixies, I’ve never owned one or even ridden one, but after seeing Premium Rush this weekend, I am sooooo tempted to buy one.  The movie itself is pretty good; not the best movie I’ve ever seen, but full of ridiculously fun biking.  Two thumbs up.

Finally, I found this tumblr just recently.  It’s not biking related, but it is a celebration of all things Memphis, which is good enough to post here.  Fuck yeah Memphis indeed!

End of the week wrap-up

Hi everyone.  Well, after an incredibly productive day yesterday spent working the yard, my immune system decided to take the rest of the weekend off.  I woke up this morning around five with aches, a mild fever, and that special kind of nasty taste in my mouth that only a cold can bring (hint: think an ass-flavored fruit roll-up … with no fruit).  On strict orders from Nurse Wife, I spent the day in bed.  Normally, getting sick really bugs the crap out of me, as I like to stay busy and be busy, even if that means just cleaning up my MP3s or sorting paperclips by color and size.  (Don’t put it past me.)  But it was actually really nice to have a day of forced rest.  We’ve both been ridiculously busy lately, Ms. Wife (and she is known in her new role as a middle-school math teacher in Frayser) especially, so I very much appreciated the downtime, even if Ms. Wife had to spend most of the day working on lesson plans for the next week.  Plus, I managed to plow through a stack of half-read New Yorkers while I rested.  Not even a cold can stop me.

But enough about my unproductive productivity.  I have some articles I’ve been saving for just the right time, which is now.

First, are cyclists the new limousine liberals?  Well, assuming that taking a limousine to work involves profuse sweating, dealing with surly drivers, and the ever-present danger of being run off the road, sure.  But that’s not the point.  Some libertarians in Washington D.C. are apparently taking issue with public subsidies for the city’s very popular and successful bike-sharing program.  Their beef is that most of the riders are college-educated and white, characteristics that don’t reflect the city’s population.  (The article does a good job of addressing that objection.)

The larger question for me revolves around subsidies.  From an economics perspective, goods and services should be subsidized when the value to society exceeds the value to the individual.  In the case of bike infrastructure, there is just such a difference in value.  It has to do with the congestion externality created by vehicular traffic.  Essentially, the individual’s decision to drive a car is motivated largely by individual costs: fuel, repair, and so on.  But the individual’s decision to drive also creates other costs which are not directly paid by the individual.  Among those costs are the reduced driving times experienced by other drivers when one more car enters a roadway.  These congestion costs are a negative externality, a cost generated by each individual but not paid by those individuals.  Generally speaking, negative externalities result in too much of some thing being done.  In this case, too many miles driven.

Cycling however carries very little congestion externality, especially in cities with robust infrastructure for cyclists.  So, a subsidy for these programs is entirely justified, as it uses a public payment to reduce a public cost.  It is worth noting that other solutions to the congestion externality, like congestion taxes, are far less popular (and politically feasible), so targeting these public funds at programs that are popular makes sense.  Plus, there are positive externalities associated with cycling, like enhanced productivity (which might be fully captured in higher wages) and decreased reliance on healthcare (which would be more difficult to capture).  Indeed, there are estimates of the net gain from cycling, and the net costs from driving.

Whatever the case, I think the subsidies are fully justified.  It would be good to see the city take steps to improve access to the program for low-income residents.  But given that libertarians are not known for arguing in favor of government programs to alleviate poverty (beyond an often misguided belief that smaller government = more freedom), it appears that their concerns are motivated more by ideology than sound economics.

Speaking of economics – and who doesn’t tremble with joy on hearing those words? – this brief article on the Marginal Revolution blog asks about the socially optimal level of bike danger.  OK, it’s really just a repost from an email to the authors of the blog, but it raises an interesting question.  Again, we see the presence of an externality, again a negative one.  The externality is the one cyclist’s decision to obey the rules of the road leads to expectations about the overall lawfulness (or lawlessness) of cyclists.  So, if a majority of cyclists in Memphis are law-abiding citizens, stopping at traffic signals and so on, then drivers should expect that any given cyclist will be law-abiding.  The danger, according to the letter, is if a large number of cyclists are scofflaws.  This could change the expectations of drivers about cyclist behavior and potentially lead to more conflicts, accidents, and so on.  (Note: I’ve written about this before.)  And, at least one person thinks that being a lawbreaker is ethical.  Works for me!

Let’s talk for a minute about the phrase “socially optimal.”  Basically, a good or service is produced at a socially optimal level when the value to society of the last unit produced equals the cost to society.  So, thinking about cyclist behavior, the socially optimal level of bike danger (or safety) is found where the benefit of one more instance of dangerous behavior exactly equals the cost.  In other words, the socially optimal level of bike danger is found where there is neither too much nor too little danger.

But again, there could be an externality here, as my decisions about how dangerous to ride could effect drivers’ expectations about how dangerous are all cyclists.  So, I should behave less dangerously, lest my reckless behavior reflect poorly on my two-wheeled brethren.

(And if you needed more libertarian content, the authors of the Marginal Revolution blog, Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok, are economists with a decidedly libertarian bent.  They are both employed at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, which is funded in part by the Koch Brothers.  Whatever the case, and however distasteful you might find the Kochs, I’ve met both Tyler and Alex, and they are both very nice guys.  Also, their microeconomics text is among the best I’ve ever read.  But enough about that.)

A few comments on another post about biking on Marginal Revolution:

  1. No, biking is not inherently dangerous, especially if drivers are polite.
  2. Discouraging biking might be the cheapest way to reduce accidents, but it is not the best way.  See above.
  3. Drivers might have a higher time-value than cyclists, but over short distances, there is little difference between driving and cycling, to say nothing of the health benefits of the latter.
In other news, the Tennessee Department of Transportation is making a statewide tour, soliciting input about transportation funding needs.  They’re scheduled to be in Memphis sometime between September 10th and 13th.  It would be great to see cyclists turn out in droves for these meetings.  Stay tuned for more details.
 
Do we need laws to protect cyclists and pedestrians?  Yes, no doubt.  But such laws will be largely meaningless without effective public education and enforcement.  Some peer-group effects couldn’t hurt either.
 
Making biking less scary?  Yes, please.  I am very pleased to see the efforts to link previously unconnected sections of bike lanes in Memphis into a truly city-wide network.  Big props to our city’s and county’s leaders for taking charge of this issue.
 
Oh, Texas.  You never fail to impress me.  OK, there’s some good stuff in the guidelines, like asking drivers to lower their speed, cover their brakes, etc.  But claiming that pedestrians and cyclists can be huge sources of danger?  Come on.  That’s so 20th century.
 
Lastly, insurance for cyclists?  Yes, please!
 
OK, that’s all I have for now.  Thanks for reading.  More to come soon.

End of the week wrap-up

My people.  It’s been a while since I posted an end-of-the-week wrap-up.  But, since I have a few minutes tonight, and a back-log of articles to share, I think it’s time.

First, what an awesome and amazing article appeared in today’s Commercial Appeal about biking in Memphis.  As I noted on my blog’s Facebook page, I couldn’t have said it better myself.  In fact, I really need to interview this guy for my blog.

Second, I hope that everyone who participated in last night’s Cycle Memphis ride had a great time.  I had planned to go, but spent the day moving boxes of books and other crap from one office to another – it’s a long story – so by last night, I was pretty shagged out.  It looks like the turn-out was really good.  I hope to make September’s ride.  The Cycle Memphis guys always put on a good show.  Hmmm … maybe I should interview them for my blog as well.

Also, from Cort at Fix Memphis, there is a bike polo tournament happening soon.  The game goes down on September 29 at Tiger Lane.  It’s also a benefit for St. Jude’s; always a good cause.  Visit memphisbikepolo.com for more information and to register.

Next, James Roberts posted a question about local bike courier services on the About page of my blog.  I didn’t have anything to tell him, but if any of you have information about any local bike messenger services, please share it in the comments.

Do I have a GPS unit on my bike?  No, unless you count my iPhone.  Do I now want a Japanese GPS unit on my bike?  Oh hell yes.

A bit late, but yikes … be careful out there, Murfreesboro.

If you needed a reminder about all the ways in which biking is awesome, and a key part of our cities’ futures, here you go.

And that’s all for now.  As always, thanks for reading, and I hope to see you all soon, biking in Memphis.

P.S.  I don’t have anyone lined up for the Cyclist of the Month profiles in the next few months, so shoot me a comment if you are interested.

Important meeting

Hey everyone.  There’s an important Public Review Meeting concerning proposed bike lanes on Tillman and Broad on August 16, from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM, in the sanctuary of First Baptist Church, 2835 Broad St.  At the meeting various issues surrounding extending bike infrastructure from the Greenline west to Overton Park will be discussed.  I plan to be there; hope you can be too.

This weekend’s activities

Hi everyone.  Just a quick post about a couple of biking activities this weekend you should know about.

The good people in the Boscos Cycling Team (including April’s Cyclist of the Month, Jason Potter) are leading a Bike to Work Train from Midtown to downtown on Friday, June 1.  The ride begins at Otherlands Coffee Bar at 7:30 AM – be there early for some java.  It will be a fun ride.

On Saturday, June 2, the monthly Cycle Memphis ride happens.  This installment meets at 7:00 PM at the gazebo at the corner of Cooper St. and Young Ave. and begins at 7:15 PM.  I don’t have a route to share with you, but every Cycle Memphis I’ve been on has been great.  I don’t think I’ll be able to attend, so have fun in my absence.

Alright Memphis, get out there and get on your bikes.

April Cyclist of the Month: Jason Potter

Hi everyone.  As I wrote just a few days ago, April is a particularly busy month for cyclists in Memphis.  There are events scheduled every weekend, sometimes more than one. But I’m particularly excited about the fourth annual Tour de Grizz, in no small part because it combines two things I love most about Memphis: basketball and biking.  The fact that the Tour was started by a really great guy, Jason Potter, the Director of Promotions and Event Presentations at the Memphis Grizzlies, makes it even better.  Read on for the history behind the Tour de Grizz and more Memphis cycling goodies.

 

1.  This marks the fourth year of the Tour de Grizz, if I’m not mistaken.  What inspired you to launch the first ride back in 2009?

I’ve wanted to put together a ride in Memphis like Tour de Grizz ever since I picked up riding again.  Four years ago, the NBA rolled out the first of its now annual “NBA Green Week” initiatives in an effort to highlight sustainability efforts and offer education to fans about the benefits of “Going Green.”  It was the perfect opportunity to give it a try.

I perceived that there was a lack of awareness and education about cycling in Memphis back when we started Tour de Grizz.  I thought that an event that combined the fun and excitement of the NBA experience with the simple joy of riding a bike could be a catalyst in introducing or reintroducing people to riding.

2.  I remember the first Tour de Grizz; there were a few dozen cyclists and we left from the parking lot of First Congo church.  Last year there were hundreds of cyclists and we occupied much of the entranceway to the Memphis Zoo.  Mayor Wharton even rode with us.  To what do you attribute the rapid growth of the Tour de Grizz?

I had high expectations for Tour de Grizz even from its humble beginnings that first year.  I truly believed we could grow the event to be something special.  What has surprised me, however, is just how excited people get about the ride.  We certainly have a lot of experienced participants from the local cycling community who do Tour de Grizz for the fun of it, but I think just as many people who come out for the ride are not used to riding among a group of people that large.  To them, this is their biggest bike adventure of the year, and to see how happy they are to be a part of a community of riders just like themselves, well, it makes it all worthwhile.

I would credit that growth and excitement to two things: the change in attitude towards cycling in Memphis and incredible support from the cycling community.

I think we can all agree that Mayor Wharton’s administration has gone a long way in helping change the attitude towards cycling with the installation of all bike facilities (with more hopefully to follow).  There will always be the grouchy folks on message boards who think it’s a waste of resources to make our streets safer for cyclists and pedestrians, and we might not change those people’s minds.  But you can tell change is coming by the fact that so many businesses have gone out of their way to invest in facilities for riders.   I think the businesses recognize this isn’t a passing trend, that to a neighborhood or business district, being bike-friendly means real money.  Then the system perpetuates itself because people see that investment on the civic level and on the business level and they feel more comfortable giving cycling a try.  This is obviously good for events like ours.

The other major impact in the growth of our event has been from the support of the cycling community of Memphis.   We’ve had tremendous partners support our event on the grassroots level: from shops (I would be remiss if I didn’t specifically thank The Peddler, Outdoors and Victory Bike Studio) to clubs like the Hightailers and IP Cycling and organizations like Revolutions, Greater Memphis Greenline, and Shelby Farms, we’ve had the cycling community bend over backwards to help spread the word and see to it that the event became a success.  More riders at our event means more customers and patrons at their respective businesses.  It’s the same at other cycling events in town, too.  For so long, cyclists felt pushed to the fringes in Memphis, and now that it’s a new day they want to make sure they are as inclusive as possible to keep the good times coming.  That’s been my experience.

Lastly, the support we’ve received from the Zoo has been phenomenal.  It’s such a fantastic organization and a jewel to the City of Memphis.  Connecting the dots to the communities/fan bases/families that claim to be a Grizzlies Fan, a Cyclist, or a Zoo Lover; well, to put it in basketball terms, it’s been a slam dunk.  There’s so much overlap among the audiences, it’s been the perfect partnership.  We would not have grown the event so quickly without the Zoo’s participation.

3.  The Tour is one of many very inclusive group bike rides in Memphis these days.  Others that come to mind are the Cycle Memphis rides, the Tweed Rides, and the Tuesday night rides sponsored by the Peddler Bike Shop.  How often do you get a chance to go on one of those other rides?

One of my goals for this year is to participate in more “leisure rides” that are similar to Tour de Grizz to keep learning about who participates in them in an effort to make the experience better for our event.  I’ve loved all of the leisure rides I’ve done in town, including the Tweed Rides you mention and even a bigger scale event like the Midnight Classic.  Any time you bring together a group of cyclists with the expressed intent of having a good time, you succeed.

4.  Do you commute to work on your bike?  What’s your commute like?

I’m a self-proclaimed “fair weather commuter.”   I tend to ride to work the most in the spring through the fall, and try to do it once or twice a week at least during my riding season.  I love my commute from Cooper Young to FedExForum.  I like to ride in to work at an easy pace, and it usually takes me around 25 minutes no matter what route I take.  This spring, the city has repaved several of the stretches of Linden and Peabody I ride on, which has made it an absolute joy compared even to last year.  You probably hear people tell you how much the ride to work clears their head and how a ride home can decompress you from a workday, and I couldn’t agree more.  For all of the inconveniences of commuting by bike (which, if we’re being honest with ourselves, I think we’d have to concede a few) I find the benefits for what it can do to your state of mind, your creativity, and your feeling of connection to your community far outweigh the negatives.

5.  I think I met you for the first time at Bike to Work Day a couple of years ago.  Are you planning to participate in that again this year?

I love the “Bike to Work Day” event and think the organizers at the Downtown Memphis Commission and Church Health Center do a magnificent job of educating people about taking the plunge and making their first commute by bike.  This will be the third year of the event, and I’ve been involved each year.  When I first learned about it, I reached out to the organizers and asked if I could lead a ride from my neighborhood to get involved.  Since then, I’ve been an official “Ride Captain” and look forward to leading an even larger number of cyclists into work this year.  I enjoy demystifying the bike commute experience to first-timers.

6.  On a scale of one to ten, how awesome is the Shelby Farms Greenline?

On its worst day, in the coldest, wettest weather imaginable, I’d say an eleven.

7.  Do you run any errands on your bike? If so, how do you handle cargo? Have you invested in any panniers?

I’m more of a messenger bag or backpack guy when riding and carrying any cargo.  I find anything I need to take to work: clothes, toiletries, etc. all fit perfectly fine.  The messenger bag can get a little uncomfortable in the summer and probably isn’t practical if you don’t have facilities to get cleaned up at work, though.If I’m going to the store, that’s enough cargo capacity for the essentials.  It is a lot of fun to take your bike to the Union Avenue Kroger, too, because people still kind of look at you like you’re crazy, which we cyclists all seem to take pride in, don’t we?

8.  Where do you go for information about bike commuting?  Are there websites you consult?  What about friends in the area who are experienced cyclists?

I guess for the most part I’ve learned about bike commuting through trial and error.  When I first got back into riding, it was primarily for fitness doing weekend endurance-style (read: spandex) rides.  I fell in love with it so badly, I wanted to find more time for riding and that’s how I first decided I’d try to ride to work.  Well, there were not such great programs in place as Bike To Work Day in Memphis yet to teach me what I needed to know, so I had no idea what the hell I was doing.  I was dressing in full-on lycra and riding to the office super-early so no one would call me “Lance” or anything.  I think I thought that’s what I was supposed to do on a road bike, that I had to dress like that to be considered a “real” cyclist.  In hindsight, it was ridiculous.

I typically commute these days in khakis and t-shirts, and either bring a change of clothes in a messenger bag or I’ll have a shirt or two hanging in the office to change into when I arrive.  I keep an extra pair of shoes at work in case I want to ride my road bike.  I guess I’ve just gotten more relaxed about riding in general.  I’ve learned that there is no right or wrong way to dress on a bike, no right kind of bike to ride, that the only thing that matters is that you are comfortable both physically and emotionally, as in “comfortable with yourself.”  You shouldn’t be riding around wondering what people are thinking about you.  You should only pay attention to where other people are so you can ride as safely as possible, and spend whatever remaining mental capacity you may have dreaming about the things you need to do, your next trip, your friends and family, all the good stuff in life. Enjoy the ride, and laugh on the inside at all the people stuck in their cars listening to their bad music.

9.  What kind of bike do you have? Are there any biking accessories you can’t live without?

I currently have three bikes and I am always looking to expand the fleet, much to the chagrin of my wife.  I’m afraid I have to tackle a better bike storage solution than our dining room before I get too carried away again.

I have a road bike, a 29er mountain bike, and a single speed.  Each has their purpose and a special place in my bike heart.  As far as accessories, it really depends on the kind of ride I’m on.  I think the only constants I have are my ID and cell phone.  I don’t ride without my helmet and I always use lights at night.

10.  What about drivers in Memphis? How friendly are they to commuter cyclists?

I find motorists in Memphis to be more and more aware of cyclists every year.  Perhaps it’s from experience gained and confidence on the road, but I think cyclists and drivers alike are getting more accustomed to the new bike facilities in town and the outcry from both sides has seemed to mellow a bit.  Maybe bikes and cars can coexist after all, right?  Having said that, I think it’s especially important for cyclists to be alert at all times while on the bike and be smart about the way they ride and the routes they choose.  After all, it’s just you and your helmet out there.  As we see all too often, the danger is greater for the one on the bike than the one surrounded by a ton of steel.

11.  Any other stories you’d like to share?

I could go on all day, but any other stories I have are better told on a bike.  I hope I see everyone out there soon.

>>>>>>

Thanks Jason.  I appreciate the interview, and I’m sure my readers will as well.  See you this Saturday at the Tour de Grizz, where hundreds of people will be biking in Memphis.

April cycling events

Hi everyone.  Spring has certainly arrived early this year, making biking ever so much more enjoyable.  I have some hope that we can make these moderate temperatures last for a few months; the last thing we need is four months of summer.  But I digress.  Just in time for spring, the month of April is exploding with bicycling events here in Memphis.  Read on for more information.

1.  Tour of Flanders Party – The Brass Door Pub – Sunday, April 1, 7:30 AM until you bonk.

Did you really need an excuse to drink beer and eat waffles at 7:30 in the morning?  Because now you have one.  Co-hosted by the good people at Victory Bicycle Studio and The Brass Door, the Tour of Flanders Party features coverage of the 2012 Tour de Flanders ride (obviously).  Get there early for a good seat in front of the 92″ FLAT SCREEN TV. Is that shit even legal?  ‘Cause I’m tripping balls just thinking about it.

542312 3580324634954 1478317063 3285368 931839280 n

2.  The Fourth Annual Tour de Grizz – Memphis Zoo; FedExForum – Saturday, April 7, more or less all day.

The Tour de Grizz is one of my favorite group rides in the city.  It begins this year as in past at the Memphis Zoo and ends up at FedExForum and is definitely fun and safe for all ages.  For $25 per person, you get one-day admission to the zoo, a terrace-level ticket to watch the Grizzlies demolish the Dallas Mavericks, plus a t-shirt and lots of other stuff I’m forgetting.  And if you want club-level seats, you can pay $55 per person and make that happen.  (Note: if you’re a Grizzlies season-ticket holder like me, it only costs $15.)  The ride begins at 5:30 PM and is escorted by the Memphis Police, which is fun in and of itself.  I’ll be there, and so should you.

Tour de grizz 120307 630

3.  15th Annual Charles Finney Ride – Lakeland Outlet Mall - Saturday, April 14, 8:00 AM.

The Memphis Hightailers are sponsoring the 15th Annual Charles Finney Ride to benefit the Church Health Center on Saturday, April 14.  There are three rides you can choose from: 18 miles, 45 miles, and 62 miles.  I won’t be able to attend, as I have a work event that day, but hopefully you can.  Click here to register.

Button Finney Ride 2012

4.  Cycle Memphis April – Cooper-Young gazebo – Saturday, April 14, 8:00 PM until around 11:00 PM.

I’ve missed the last couple Cycle Memphis rides due to prior commitments, so I am super-excited about this month’s ride.  Normally held on the first Saturday of the month, Cycle Memphis April was pushed back a weekend due to the Tour de Grizz.  I’ve written about the Cycle Memphis rides before – they’re always a good time.  I imagine that the crowd will be extra large this time, what with the weather improving and all.  And, as an added bonus, I will be DJing the ride.  That’s right – I’ve volunteered to create the musical soundtrack for April’s ride.  I used to DJ some back in grad school, so I’m excited to dust off my skills and select some tunes for the people.

161923 174860925967087 529966017 n

(Note: that should read 2012, not 2011.)

5.  The Dorothy Day House of Hospitality Family Fun Rides – Levitt Shell at Overton Park – Saturday, April 14, 7:00 AM.

The Memphis Rotary Club is sponsoring Families Supporting Families, a day of bike rides to benefit the Dorothy Day House, which provides shelter and support for homeless families in Memphis.  There are three rides that day: a 1/2 mile family run ride around Overton Park, plus two rides to Shelby Forest and back, at 33 and 53 miles.  The longer rides begin at 8:00 AM and the fun ride at 10:00 AM.  Click here to register.

Dorothy Day Ride

6.  Bikesploitation II: Some Bike it Hot! submission deadline – Friday, April 20.

The good people at Live from Memphis are once again sponsoring Bikesploitation, a festival of bike-related films.  The festival isn’t until May 18, but the deadline for submissions is Friday, April 20.  Click here to read more and here to learn about how to submit your own film.  Hmm … maybe it’s time for me to get that handlebar-mounted camera I’ve been eyeing.

Honorable Mention - Ignite: Sustainability – The Zone at the FedEx Institute of Technology, University of Memphis Campus – Tuesday, April 3, 6:00 PM.

While this event doesn’t have any biking-related content per se, my good friend Matt Farr, along with Launch Memphis, Sustainable Shelby, and the University of Memphis, is organizing Ignite: Sustainability to promote ideas for sustainable products and projects in Memphis.  I was planning to present but had to bow out due to my work load.  It should be a great event though, so plan to go if you can.  Here’s more information.

>>>>>>

What a great month we have in store.  So much biking, so few Saturdays.  I hope you can attend all of these events; I know I’ll be at most of them.  Did I miss anything?  Leave me a message in the comments.

Stolen bike alert!

People.  This just in from local cyclist Craig Schuster:

My bikes have been stolen. Both my blue Schwinn Cruiser and my custom made Tricycle. Please share this photo and help me look for them, especially the Trike. If you see anything that looks like the trike in any way, contact me or the police immediately. Craig Schuster, (901) 278-3489.

Here’s a picture of the (really sweet) custom tricycle.

426878 10150624399239495 236916594494 9488361 905092780 n

Please keep an eye out for the bikes.  Contact Detective Keaton with the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office if you see them.  His number is (901) 568-5645.

Let’s get these bikes back home.